Interning at Microsoft Research

September 2016

I just finished spending the summer at Microsoft Research in Cambridge. I was interning with the Human Experience and Design research group, which, as its name suggests, is a group that researches around human experiences with computing. HXD is a multidisciplinary team with a skill-set encompassing design and social science in addition to engineering.

Best Paper Award - EVA 2016

'Using Data Visualisation to tell Stories about Collections'

July 2016

My supervisor Stephen and I presented at the Electronic Visualisation and the Arts London conference held at the British Computer Society. The paper, 'Using Data Visualisation to tell Stories about Collections', was also co-authored with Dr. Florian Kräutli (now at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science).

Attending Google I/O 2016

May 2016

Developer conference Google I/O 2016 was held near Google's global headquarters in Mountain View, California and I was lucky enough to be awarded a ticket and travel scholarship from Women Who Code

Wellcome Library visualisations

Public health reports

April 2016

I have been doing some work with the digitised Medical Officer of Health (MOH) reports from the Wellcome Library. The MOH reports were produced each year by the Medical Officer of Health of a London district and set out the work done by their public health

Research featured in Royal College of Art news

April 2016

“RCA Researchers Put Chronographics on the Scholarly Map”: The Royal College of Art has published an article on their website featuring my research and that of my supervisor Prof Stephen Boyd Davis and colleagues Dr Florian Kräutli and Sam Cottrell.

Visual Text Analytics Workshop

Imperial College & LSE

March 2016

I attended this 2-day workshop “bringing together experts in text analysis to share knowledge, best practice, and tools and techniques for text analysis visualisations”.

British Library visualisations


Feb 2016

One of the British Library Labs datasets I have been working on is 40,000 digitised playbills (posters announcing a theatrical performance pasted up or distributed on the street) from British theatres 1750-1900. This data consists of metadata (theatre name, date etc.), and pdfs containing scanned playbills.